Janae’s life as a VISTA

I choose to become a VISTA because I wanted to gain more experience working at a non-profit and to give back. I also wanted to continue exploring public service positions. I had just finished my 10-month service term in another AmeriCorps program NCCC-FEMA Corps Member where I served all over the country and I enjoyed that work,  but I wanted to get a different experience with another AmeriCorps program that would focus on my home state. Both my experiences in these different AmeriCorps programs while completely different have been once in a lifetime experience and have taught me how to be an engaged and active citizen.

For small nonprofits like CCCS and others in the Savannah Area, VISTA’s are essential for bringing in capacity building resources such as volunteers and new fundraising methods but also new ideas and new technologies. In all the nonprofits I have worked or interned at, people working there usually have multiple roles. As a VISTA we are able to come into an organization as a resource and focus on important organization things that may otherwise not have top priority and really add to the continued sustainability of that organization. This is something I have seen being done being done by my fellow VISTA not only in the Savannah but around the country as well.

The best thing about working for Consumer Credit Counseling Services (CCCS) was working with people who are truly passionate about their work and the impact that they have in the Savannah Community.  While working at CCCS, I was able to see how invaluable having a non-profit money management and financial education service is to the citizens of Savannah. I have been able to do outreach in the community and truly feel that I have made a difference in a person’s life by recommending CCCS services, because I had seen firsthand how people had been helped by CCCS services.

The two successes I am the proudest of is the CCCS website and fundraiser. I would say a big success was updating the website to make it more functional and easier to maneuver for clients. The fundraiser was another because it was the first fundraiser like that done at CCCS and in 5 hours we raised over 700 hundred dollars.

 

Summer 500 and Summer Jobs Connect initiative

     The Summer 500 program has kicked off this year with hundreds of Savannah/Chatham County youth working in summer internships. Hundreds of young adults have entered the workforce for the first time. Summer 500 gives these teenagers a chance to understand and build their financial awareness. For the majority of the students, this will be their first paycheck ever. During the first week of the program, the students took classes focused on workplace safety, workplace communication, and financial education.

     The students are urged to have a bank account and utilize direct deposit as a safe and convenient way to receive their paychecks. This program has partnered with the Cities for Financial Empowerment (CFE) Fund’s Summer Jobs Connect (SJC) initiative in an effort strengthen the integration of banking access into the Summer 500 program. Step Up issued a request for proposals for financial institution partners using the SJC youth account standards. Two institutions were chosen as the official partners of the Summer 500 for their ability to create special accounts that met the national standards. South State Bank and Members First Credit Union have designed special accounts that do not offer overdraft, are non-custodial, and can be opened off-site (among other features). Both institutions were able to be present at the Summer 500 orientation to open accounts and present financial education topics. South State Bank and Members First Credit Union have recognized that this type of account in imperative for young adults entering the workforce for the first time. Since the kickoff of Summer 500, there have been 151 accounts opened for participants, with many youth opening both checking and savings accounts.

     Step Up looks forward to building upon these relationships and learning from the experience this year to further increase the integration of banking access into the program next year.      

Chris, a Summer 500 student shares his plans for his first financial goal.

    The CFE Fund’s twitter campaign has a competition every week and awards three individuals with prizes. CFE will distribute amazon gift cards and even an iPad during the Summer Jobs Connect program. During the first week, a student from Savannah was one of the first chosen for a prize. See Chris’s entry and plan for his first paycheck here. You can learn more about Summer Jobs Connect here.

 

 

My AmeriCorps VISTA Story

My AmeriCorps VISTA Story

By Callie Martin

     Since I was a little girl, I’ve been a patriot. I always knew I wanted to make a sacrifice to my homeland. So after I graduated college, I chose to spend my first year in the “real world” as an AmeriCorps VISTA. During the past year, I have lived on the poverty level and felt what many Americans endure their entire lives. I think to represent the people, you have to understand the people. Not long into my service year, I realized that food stamps were literally saving my life. If I didn’t live in a country that cared about the good of the people, I would have had to choose between eating and making it to work. I’m grateful to have served my country to know that there is such a thing as “one paycheck away from homeless”. To give a helping hand, lend a voice, and protect the future, we have to live a life of empathy. AmeriCorps put my lens in focus to see what it means to live an intentional life for the good of your community.

     Through AmeriCorps, I was placed in United Way of the Coastal Empire (UWCE) to complete my service year. UWCE funds over 100 programs in a four county area. I had the pleasure of visiting each funded agency in Savannah. At the end of each visit, the needs of the community I was serving felt more vital and necessary. Needs are in high volume and those that work to serve others are tireless and dedicated individuals that I could never take for granted. More than that, the people that are in need are real humans with the sole agenda of survival. To pull themselves and their families out of poverty takes time, opportunities, and compassion. UWCE does more than most nonprofits can, but outside of maintaining the current workload they couldn’t dedicate the time to projects such as the ones that I was able to focus on and complete. As an AmeriCorps VISTA, I was viewed as a resource and the value of my work to improve the lives of those in poverty is evergreen. There is no dollar price on the lives that are made better because a VISTA took the bottom barrel paycheck and committed a year of service to their country to make long-lasting change. My future career and life choices will always reflect the truths that I found during my service year as AmeriCorps VISTA.

Step Up is Hiring!

PT Graphic Design and Grant Coordination Associate

Step Up Savannah seeks a self-motivated individual with graphic design and project management skills to assist in achieving program goals and communicate impact.

The ideal candidate has experience in the production of print advertising, websites, web banners, and landing pages as well as posters, banners, and signage. This is an 8-16 hour/week position; days flexible.

Responsibilities will include meeting with program leads to determine the scope of a project, develop graphics and creating designs to accurately portray the desired message, presenting to the department, and working with vendors. We are looking for an individual with strong conceptual skills and the ability to look at projects from various perspectives to design innovating approaches and solutions.

In addition, this position will assist with grant reporting and project assessment through tracking expenses and progress toward grant goals as well as assisting Step Up staff in preparing grant reports.

Skills Requirements:

  • Bachelor’s degree in Graphic Design or related field or 2+ years of relevant experience
  • Adobe Creative Suite
  • Microsoft Office with exceptional Microsoft PowerPoint skills
  • WordPress
  • Experience with branding
  • Ability to see project through from beginning to end with minimal supervision
  • Strong attention to detail

To apply, send a resume and cover letter to Carole Fireall at cfireall@stepupsavannah.org.

We Need to Protect Consumers from Prepaid Card Fraud, Fees

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                 Contact:  Kate Blair
February 14, 2017                                                                    kblair@stepupsavannah.org

U.S. Senators Perdue, Isakson Aim to Block Common-Sense Measures to Protect Consumers from Prepaid Card Fraud, Fees

Bill introduced would repeal consumer protection rules through fast-track law, impacting more 440,000 Georgia households

Savannah, Ga. – February 13, 2017 – Today, Step Up Savannah called on Georgia’s U.S. Senators David Perdue and Johnny Isakson to side with Georgians by refusing to use an obscure law to block the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s (CFPB) prepaid card rule. The move—made public through a resolution filed in the U.S. Senate last week—would block basic visa-prepaid-1600x900protections against fraud, unauthorized charges and errors from being extend to all prepaid card users.

Just as concerning, the legislative tool Senators Perdue and Isakson have chosen for this effort, the Congressional Review Act (CRA), is arcane law that gives Congress a window to fast-track the repeal of regulations from being implemented without the threat of a filibuster. Once an approved CRA resolution is signed by the President, the targeted rule is blocked and the agency can never propose another substantially similar rule without prior approval from Congress.

By attempting to permanently shelter prepaid cards from the same consumer protections that apply to debit cards, Senators Perdue and Isakson would allow prepaid card provider NetSpend—whose parent company is based in Georgia—to continue taking $80 million annually from consumers in overdraft fees. NetSpend is the only major provider to charge overdraft fees on prepaid cards, which the company primarily sells at payday loan and check-cashing stores and through payroll cards used by employers of low-wage workers.

Step_Up_JenSingeisen_03

Jen Singeisen, Executive Director of Step Up Savannah

“It is alarming that in our own home state, our Senators would want to block common-sense consumer protections, such as
basic fraud protection and fee transparency, from applying to all prepaid card users, including the hundreds of thousands of Georgia households that use these products each year,” said Jennifer Singeisen, Executive Director of Step Up Savannah. “We call on Senators Perdue and Isakson to side with these Georgians, as well as countless others across the country, and not with companies like NetSpend who use overdraft fees to strip hard-earned dollars from the pockets of our most vulnerable consumers. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s important work, including the return of nearly $12 billion to 29 million consumers, has been incredibly important to residents of Chatham County, Georgia and to our nation.”

For consumers locked out of the financial mainstream and for those seeking to avoid costly overdraft fees, prepaid cards represent an opportunity for families to have safe, affordable access to their hard-earned money. In Georgia alone, more than 440,000 underbanked households used prepaid cards in 2015, according to the FDIC. Assessing unscrupulous fees on these products diminishes the power of prepaid cards to help consumers get ahead, rather than falling farther behind.

NetSpend’s payday-lender-sold prepaid cards have unusual features that allow payday lenders to repay themselves by extracting money from the card, thus triggering overdraft fees for consumers who are largely unaware of how much money is being extracted and when. NetSpend’s cards offer an opt-in overdraft “protection” that allows the card to be used when it is empty, with the overdraft and a $15 to $25 fee taken out of the next deposit to the card.

A CFPB survey found that 98% of prepaid cards do not have overdraft fees. This includes the nation’s largest prepaid card company, Green Dot, which does not charge overdraft fees and supports the CFPB prepaid rule.

The CFPB rule currently under attack in the U.S. Senate was issued last fall and is scheduled to go into effect on October 1. It extends strong protections to prepaid card users, including some of the same basic fraud and fee protections that debit card users already enjoy. In addition, the rule includes new disclosure standards that would help consumers better understand key information about prepaid cards in order to comparison shop and make informed decisions. While the rule does not prohibit overdraft fees, it does require hybrid prepaid-credit cards that can overdraft to comply with established consumer protections for credit cards, including consideration of a consumer’s ability to make payments on credit extended to them.

 

Georgia Work Credit can help working families step up

By Jen Singeisen

Too many in our community struggle to step up into the middle class, even as they strive to do all the right things to work their way up the economic ladder. More than a quarter of Savannah’s residents live in poverty. Many neighborhoods have seen jobs vanish and incomes fall over the past three decades. When hardworking people can’t get ahead, it weighs down the economy as a whole and undermines our community’s ability to thrive. At Step Up Savannah, we engage all sectors of the community to improve the economic mobility and financial stability of families. Helping people step up benefits us all; studies show a strong link between broad-based opportunity and economic growth. Low economic mobility and financial stability are community-wide issues that diminish our overall economic potential.

While there is no silver bullet for the complex challenges facing families today, but state leaders do have some proven tools at their disposal. This legislative session, our state lawmakers can enact a time-tested policy with strong bipartisan support to give an economic boost to working families.

Today is EITC Awareness Day, a chance to recognize the enormous impact the national Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) has on our community. Created in 1975, the EITC is a federal policy that cuts taxes for low-wage workers like cashiers and nurses, providing a wage boost for families moving toward the middle class. In 2017, about 32,000 Chatham County families will claim the national EITC, bringing in nearly $100 million to our economy.

Georgia can build on this success by enacting a Georgia Work Credit, a state version of the EITC. To be eligible for the credit, Social-Media-Templates-EITC-Day (1)_Page_3recipients must work; making this a great incentive to keep folks in the workforce.  Many are seeing this as a viable alternative to raising the minimum wage. A Georgia Work Credit would provide a tax break up to help working families make ends meet. Evidence from the EITC and other states shows that a Georgia Work Credit would help families in Chatham County work their way to the middle class by making key investments, saving for a rainy day and making sure bills get paid. A Georgia Work Credit would also help children as research has shown that the EITC is linked to healthier babies, better school performance and higher earnings later in life. More than helping individual families, the Georgia Work Credit would also pump over $8.7 million into our local businesses.

The General Assembly should take a page from our Chatham County Legislative Delegation and take a serious look at the potential of a Georgia Work Credit as a vehicle to provide a bottom-up tax cut to working families. A Georgia Work Credit would help build the middle class, impart lifelong benefits for children and provide a pivotal step up the economic ladder for thousands of families in our community.

Staff Recommended Holiday Shopping List

Have you started your holiday shopping yet? The staff at Step Up wanted to help you  with this really great list of books that have helped to shape the way we do our work. Each staff member submitted one or two of their favorite books that helped to shape the way they do their work. To make it even easier, I added some hyperlinks and pictures. All you have to do is click!

Why not buy a copy for yourself and start a book club as one of your new year’s resolutions. There is no better time than the present to expand your mind and positively impact your community.

Kate Blair, Director of Development & Communication

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness

Once in a great while a book comes along that changes the way we see the world and helps to fuel a nationwide social movement. The New Jim Crow is such a book. Praised by Harvard Law professor Lani Guinier as “brave and bold,” this book directly challenges the notion that the election of Barack Obama signals a new era of colorblindness. With dazzling candor, legal scholar Michelle Alexander argues that “we have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it.” By targeting black men through the War on Drugs and decimating communities of color, the U.S. criminal justice system functions as a contemporary system of racial control—relegating millions to a permanent second-class status—even as it formally adheres to the principle of colorblindness. In the words of Benjamin Todd Jealous, president and CEO of the NAACP, this book is a “call to action.”

Talisha Crooks, Chatham Apprentice Program Coordinator

The Working Poor

As David K. Shipler makes clear in this powerful, humane study, the invisible poor are engaged in the activity most respected in American ideology—hard, honest work. But their version of the American Dream is a nightmare: low-paying, dead-end jobs; the profound failure of government to improve upon decaying housing, health care, and education; the failure of families to break the patterns of child abuse and substance abuse. Shipler exposes the interlocking problems by taking us into the sorrowful, infuriating, courageous lives of the poor—white and black, Asian and Latino, citizens and immigrants. We encounter them every day, for they do jobs essential to the American economy.

Rebecca Elias, AmeriCorps VISTA

Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City

Even in the most desolate areas of American cities, evictions used to be rare. But today, most poor renting families are spending more than half of their income on housing, and eviction has become ordinary, especially for single mothers. In vivid, intimate prose, Matthew Desmond provides a ground-level view of one of the most urgent issues facing America today. As we see families forced  into shelters, squalid apartments, or more dangerous neighborhoods, we bear witness to the human cost of America’s vast inequality—and to people’s determination and intelligence in the face of hardship.

Based on years of embedded fieldwork and painstakingly gathered data, this masterful book transforms our understanding of extreme poverty and economic exploitation while providing fresh ideas for solving a devastating, uniquely American problem. Its unforgettable scenes of hope and loss remind us of the centrality of home, without which nothing else is possible.

Isaac Felton, Chatham Apprentice Program Manager

How the Poor Can Save Capitalism: Rebuilding the Path to the Middle Class

John Hope Bryant, successful self-made businessman and founder of the nonprofit Operation HOPE, says business and political leaders are ignoring the one force that could truly re-energize the stalled American economy: the poor. If we give poor communities the right tools, policies, and inspiration, he argues, they will be able to lift themselves up into the middle class and become a new generation of customers and entrepreneurs.

Bryant radically redefines the meaning of poverty and wealth. (It’s not just a question of finances; it’s values too.) He exposes why attempts to aid the poor so far have fallen short and offers a way forward: the HOPE Plan, a series of straightforward, actionable steps to build financial literacy and expand opportunity so that the poor can join the middle class.

Carole Fireall, Office Administrator & NLA Coordinator

The Essence of Leadership

The Essence of Leadership is book three in this image driven, inspirational, motivational series. In Mac’s first two books, the focus was on what it takes to obtain true success in life and how to achieve the right kind of attitude. Both previous books used inspirational stories and described the importance of how to achieve personal progress through character traits and godly living-all of this reinforced by the power of inspiring and striking imagery. In The Essence of Leadership, Mac takes a similar approach to direct readers to achieve personal success through integrity, ethics, loyalty, persistence, faith matters, and many more character traits that form the leader within a person.

Nate Saraceno, Graphic Designer

Ghettoside: A True Story of Murder in America

Here is the kaleidoscopic story of the quintessential, but mostly ignored, American murder—a “ghettoside” killing, one young black man slaying another—and a brilliant and driven cadre of detectives whose creed is to pursue justice for forgotten victims at all costs. Ghettoside is a fast-paced narrative of a devastating crime, an intimate portrait of detectives and a community bonded in tragedy, and a surprising new lens into the great subject of why murder happens in our cities—and how the epidemic of killings might yet be stopped.

Jen Singeisen, Executive Director

Teaching With Poverty in Mind: What Being Poor Does to Kids’ Brains and What Schools Can Do About It

In Teaching with Poverty in Mind: What Being Poor Does to Kids’ Brains and What Schools Can Do About It, veteran educator and brain expert Eric Jensen takes an unflinching look at how poverty hurts children, families, and communities across the United States and demonstrates how schools can improve the academic achievement and life readiness of economically disadvantaged students.

Jensen argues that although chronic exposure to poverty can result in detrimental changes to the brain, the brain’s very ability to adapt from experience means that poor children can also experience emotional, social, and academic success. A brain that is susceptible to adverse environmental effects is equally susceptible to the positive effects of rich, balanced learning environments and caring relationships that build students’ resilience, self-esteem, and character.

Robyn Wainner, Director of Wealth Building

Scarcity: The New Science of Having Less and How It Defines Our Lives 

In this provocative book based on cutting-edge research, Sendhil Mullainathan and Eldar Shafir show that scarcity creates a distinct psychology for everyone struggling to manage with less than they need. Busy people fail to manage their time efficiently for the same reasons the poor and those maxed out on credit cards fail to manage their money.

Once we start thinking in terms of scarcity, the problems of modern life come into sharper focus, and Scarcity reveals not only how it leads us astray but also how individuals and organizations can better manage scarcity for greater satisfaction and success.

Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness

Nudge is about choices—how we make them and how we can make better ones. Drawing on decades of research in the fields of behavioral science and economics, authors Richard H. Thaler and Cass R. Sunstein offer a new perspective on preventing the countless mistakes we make—ill-advised personal investments, consumption of unhealthy foods, neglect of our natural resources—and show us how sensible “choice architecture” can successfully nudge people toward the best decisions. In the tradition of The Tipping Point and Freakonomics, Nudge is straightforward, informative, and entertaining—a must-read for anyone interested in our individual and collective well-being.

My Journey to AmeriCorps

By: Rebecca Elias, Americorp VISTA for Step Up Savannah

South Bronx. Mott Haven. 1990s. At the time, this area was considered one of the worst places to live in NYC. At the time, I did not know that. Sometimes when I think about my childhood, I only have good memories; running through fire hydrants, babybeckyplaying tag, or jumping rope with my sister and our friends. Now I think of the hot metal slides, the scars on my knees from playing on gravel and asphalt and stern warning from my mom to not let other kids play with my toys. There’s danger, but I only have an abstract concept of it. This is my home and I love it here.

Growing up, I didn’t consider myself different from any of the other kids in my neighborhood. We all went to the same parks and the same school (and we all hated school.) School made me feel stupid. I didn’t understand things as quickly as the other students so I spent most of my time socializing, but it seemed like my older sister was made for school. The better she did, the worse I felt and by the time I graduated high school, I was completely done with school.

I wasn’t the only one. Going to college was an anomaly in my neighborhood. I moved in with a friend and started working full-time at a clothing store. My sister came home during vacation grownbeckyand immediately put a stop to my lifestyle. She decided that I was going to college. I was conflicted. I wasn’t exactly happy folding clothes all day, but I definitely did not get along with school. My sister shrugged and simply said, “You’re smart. You just learn differently than other people.”

She was right. I made it through community college then transferred to Buffalo State College. Buffalo State changed me. I saw that where I grew up has a major impact on how I did in school and the things I did not have access to. The schools I went to were too overcrowded for teachers to adjust their teaching methods for each and every student. I didn’t have access to tutors or after school activities. My sister only had access to certain programs because she was introduced to them via her best friend (and she grew up in a “better” neighborhood).

I realized I could use how I grew up to positively help families like mine to reach their full potentials while also reaching mine. After graduating college, I felt compelled to show anyone living in the same environment that I grew up in that it is possible to break the cycle of poverty. I have a desire to help lower- income families and neighborhoods grow and improve. I am only one person and I cannot save the world, but I am confident that my commitment to community service will a make an impressionRebecca on at least one person in any community. This is why I decided to join AmeriCorps. I want to make changes in different low income neighborhoods throughout the country. I served one year as an AmeriCorps member in Fresno, California and even small changes like a homework help center or family movie night made a difference in that community. Now I’m using my skills to help create opportunity in Savannah. I know from experience that all it takes is a small change to make a big impact in someone’s life and that’s what AmeriCorps VISTA allows me to do every day.

When my sister and I talk about our childhood now, we still mention the games and the fire hydrants but there’s a small hint of regret. Our mom did the best she could under the circumstances but sometimes we wish we were able to take dance classes or learn an instrument. The parks are better now; gravel and metal are replaced with soft padding and colorful plastic and the graffiti is mostly gone but the opportunities are still not there. One day (if someone doesn’t beat me to it) with all the experience and knowledge I gained from AmeriCorps, I’m going to go back and help enrich my childhood community.

 

NLA Post 2

This is the second in a five-part series introducing Neighborhood Leadership Academy (NLA) graduates who have been awarded mini-grants to assist with their work in our community. 

2016 NLA Grant Recipient – Betty Jones

About Betty Jones

President of the Feiler Park Neighborhood Association, board member of Step Up Savannah, Associate Minister at Lifeway MBBetty Jones
Church, and coordinator of the Lifeway afterschool tutorial program, Betty Jones has been dedicated to service all her life.  She also worked in the Savannah-Chatham Public school system as a special education teacher and counselor for many years.

After completing the Neighborhood Leadership Academy (Class 4), Ms. Jones has become even more involved in her community. She is also involved in PACES, an organization which advocates for affordable housing. Through the NLA, Ms. Jones worked with two other classmates, Tithia Young and Tabatha Crawford-Roberts to start a Community 411 resource center.  They work to help people in the community get connected with resources that they may need.  Ms. Jones said that people don’t always know what resources are available to them; she hopes they will “pay it forward” and work to get the needs of others met too.

Of the training program, she said, “I have been able to become a better disciplined and organized person in my personal life and in the organizations I am a member of.”

What is Feiler Park Neighborhood Association?

The Feiler Park Neighborhood Association, Inc. mission is to work together with officials of the City of Savannah and Chatham County to upgrade and maintain services in the Feiler Park Community that will provide the residents with the quality residential life experience they deserve in their neighborhood.

How will the mini-grant help?

The Feiler Park Neighborhood Association Inc. seeks to provide a place in their community where residents of all ages can express themselves through gardening. A community garden will be open to individuals, families, and organizations in the to plant and harvest fresh nutritious foods. Gardeners will share the harvest with each other so that everyone will benefit.

The Feiler Park Neighborhood Association identified the need for better diet and nutrition for Feiler Park residents. The board feels that gardening would help in various ways, including providing the community with the skills necessary to improve the overall well-being of their families.

Are you interested in participating in Step Up’s Neighborhood Leadership Academy? Applications are currently being accepted, visit www.nlasavannah.org.

Neighborhood Leadership Academy Mini-Grant Program

This is the first in a two-part series introducing Neighborhood Leadership Academy (NLA) graduates who have been awarded mini-grants to assist with their work in our community. 

2016 NLA Grant Recipient – Tina Browntina-brown

About Tina Brown
Award- Winning Journalist Tina A. Brown is president of TAB Brown Publishing, a multimedia professional services company. A journalist for over thirty years, Ms. Brown completed a contract with the VOICExperience Foundations’ Beautiful Voices Savannah opera training program as a Public Relations manager and media consultant. She is also an AIDS activist and the author of Crooked Road Straight: The Awakening of AIDS Activist Linda Jordan, a book about one woman’s message of hope for those suffering with AIDS.

Ms. Brown worked in partnership with Savannah State University and the Moses Jackson Community Center to run a journalism and multimedia camp for high school students called SSU Media High. This matured during her participation in the Neighborhood Leadership Academy (Class 3). She credits NLA with having helped her develop her program and link it with another organization.

What is SSU Media High?
At SSU Media High, students experiment and interact with cutting-edge technology to build 21st century skills, while also learning the basics of journalism and mass communication. Up to 20 high school students will receive technology and media skills training during a two-week residential camp. By producing a daily digital “magazine,”teens acquire lifetime digital technology skills while also preparing for school media projects. The staff of the camp will consist of seasoned media professionals as instructors, and Savannah State mass communications majors serving as mentors. In addition, SSU Media High is recruits technology and Geek Squad talent to provide demonstrations and hands-on training of the latest technology.

How will the mini-grant help?
Step Up Savannah’s grant will assist SSU Media High in achieving its goals which are to: bridge the digital divide by enabling underserved and minority students to become innovators and creators of digital technology, provide underserved and minority teens with web and social media skills, enable students to develop multimedia packages and take home multimedia personal apps for their smartphones and multimedia packages, instruct students on how to create and use blogs, digital cameras, and mobile devices including smart phones and tablet, provide snacks for students between meal time, provide students with hands-on digital media learning opportunities and, provide meals.

Are you interested in participating in Step Up’s Neighborhood Leadership Academy? Applications are currently being accepted, visit www.nlasavannah.org.