NLA Post 2

June 29th, 2016 by

This is the second in a five-part series introducing Neighborhood Leadership Academy (NLA) graduates who have been awarded mini-grants to assist with their work in our community. 

2016 NLA Grant Recipient – Betty Jones

About Betty Jones

President of the Feiler Park Neighborhood Association, board member of Step Up Savannah, Associate Minister at Lifeway MBBetty Jones
Church, and coordinator of the Lifeway afterschool tutorial program, Betty Jones has been dedicated to service all her life.  She also worked in the Savannah-Chatham Public school system as a special education teacher and counselor for many years.

After completing the Neighborhood Leadership Academy (Class 4), Ms. Jones has become even more involved in her community. She is also involved in PACES, an organization which advocates for affordable housing. Through the NLA, Ms. Jones worked with two other classmates, Tithia Young and Tabatha Crawford-Roberts to start a Community 411 resource center.  They work to help people in the community get connected with resources that they may need.  Ms. Jones said that people don’t always know what resources are available to them; she hopes they will “pay it forward” and work to get the needs of others met too.

Of the training program, she said, “I have been able to become a better disciplined and organized person in my personal life and in the organizations I am a member of.”

What is Feiler Park Neighborhood Association?

The Feiler Park Neighborhood Association, Inc. mission is to work together with officials of the City of Savannah and Chatham County to upgrade and maintain services in the Feiler Park Community that will provide the residents with the quality residential life experience they deserve in their neighborhood.

How will the mini-grant help?

The Feiler Park Neighborhood Association Inc. seeks to provide a place in their community where residents of all ages can express themselves through gardening. A community garden will be open to individuals, families, and organizations in the to plant and harvest fresh nutritious foods. Gardeners will share the harvest with each other so that everyone will benefit.

The Feiler Park Neighborhood Association identified the need for better diet and nutrition for Feiler Park residents. The board feels that gardening would help in various ways, including providing the community with the skills necessary to improve the overall well-being of their families.

Are you interested in participating in Step Up’s Neighborhood Leadership Academy? Applications are currently being accepted, visit www.nlasavannah.org.

Neighborhood Leadership Academy Mini-Grant Program

June 16th, 2016 by

This is the first in a two-part series introducing Neighborhood Leadership Academy (NLA) graduates who have been awarded mini-grants to assist with their work in our community. 

2016 NLA Grant Recipient – Tina Browntina-brown

About Tina Brown
Award- Winning Journalist Tina A. Brown is president of TAB Brown Publishing, a multimedia professional services company. A journalist for over thirty years, Ms. Brown completed a contract with the VOICExperience Foundations’ Beautiful Voices Savannah opera training program as a Public Relations manager and media consultant. She is also an AIDS activist and the author of Crooked Road Straight: The Awakening of AIDS Activist Linda Jordan, a book about one woman’s message of hope for those suffering with AIDS.

Ms. Brown worked in partnership with Savannah State University and the Moses Jackson Community Center to run a journalism and multimedia camp for high school students called SSU Media High. This matured during her participation in the Neighborhood Leadership Academy (Class 3). She credits NLA with having helped her develop her program and link it with another organization.

What is SSU Media High?
At SSU Media High, students experiment and interact with cutting-edge technology to build 21st century skills, while also learning the basics of journalism and mass communication. Up to 20 high school students will receive technology and media skills training during a two-week residential camp. By producing a daily digital “magazine,”teens acquire lifetime digital technology skills while also preparing for school media projects. The staff of the camp will consist of seasoned media professionals as instructors, and Savannah State mass communications majors serving as mentors. In addition, SSU Media High is recruits technology and Geek Squad talent to provide demonstrations and hands-on training of the latest technology.

How will the mini-grant help?
Step Up Savannah’s grant will assist SSU Media High in achieving its goals which are to: bridge the digital divide by enabling underserved and minority students to become innovators and creators of digital technology, provide underserved and minority teens with web and social media skills, enable students to develop multimedia packages and take home multimedia personal apps for their smartphones and multimedia packages, instruct students on how to create and use blogs, digital cameras, and mobile devices including smart phones and tablet, provide snacks for students between meal time, provide students with hands-on digital media learning opportunities and, provide meals.

Are you interested in participating in Step Up’s Neighborhood Leadership Academy? Applications are currently being accepted, visit www.nlasavannah.org.

For Immediate Release: No Affordable Housing Available in Savannah for Minimum Wage Workers

May 25th, 2016 by

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 25, 2016

Contact: Kate Blair   | 912.232.6747  |  kblair@stepupsavannah.org

In order to afford a modest, two-bedroom apartment at Fair Market Rent in Savannah, renters need to earn $17.25 per hour. This is Savannah’s 2016 Housing Wage, revealed in a national report released today. The report, Out of Reach 2016, was jointly released by the National Low Income Housing Coalition, a Washington, DC-based research and advocacy organization, and Georgia ACT, a statewide membership organization of community development and housing counseling agencies.

Every year, Out of Reach reports on the Housing Wage for all states, counties, and metropolitan areas in the United States. The report highlights the gap between what renters earn and what it costs to afford rent at fair market value.

“That the Savannah area is listed among the most expensive of Georgia’s rental markets comes as no real surprise,” said Suzanne Donovan, director of Step Up Savannah.  “The average rent of $897 for a two-bedroom here means families need to earn almost $36,000 a year to afford a place without being overly burdened. One of the toughest requests we’re faced with at Step Up is from families looking for housing. We’ve got thousands on long wait lists for public housing neighborhoods and housing vouchers in our community, and an aging housing stock that lacks proper weatherization, just to name a few problems. We regularly talk with mothers and fathers on the verge of eviction, already paying up to 50% of their income on housing.” Donovan points out that Savannah has a mechanism that can make a difference, a municipal Affordable Housing Fund, but it needs a dedicated revenue stream to keep up with the demand for construction or rehabilitation of housing that working families can afford.

The federal minimum wage has remained at $7.25 an hour without an increase since 2009, generating debate and calls to raise the wage both at the state and federal level. In no state, even those where the minimum wage has been set above the federal standard, can a minimum wage renter working a 40 hour work week afford a two-bedroom rental unit at the average Fair Market Rent. Working at the minimum wage of $7.25/hr. in Georgia, a family must have 2.2 wage earners working full-time, or one full-time earner working 90 hours at the minimum wage, to afford a modest two-bedroom apartment.

“The Out of Reach data reflect a grim reality across the nation. There is no place in the United States where a minimum wage worker can afford a two-bedroom apartment,” said Diane Yentel, President and CEO of the National Low Income Housing Coalition. “We as a nation must respond by investing in affordable housing for the lowest income households in America. The new national Housing Trust Fund is one solution, but it will require many more resources to address the need.”

For a look at the full report, visit: http://www.nlihc.org/oor

Tax Time = Time to Save

January 20th, 2016 by

Did you know that retirement is the only thing you can’t borrow money to do? Tax time provides a great opportunity for people
retirementto start saving for the future, which will be here before you know it. Even setting aside a small portion of your refund is a great start. For those who haven’t found an easy way to save, myRA (my Retirement Account) is a great place to start. This tax season, tax filers can get on the path to more secure retirements and, if eligible, take advantage of the Saver’s Tax Credit with myRA.

What is myRA?

myRA is a new starter retirement savings account developed by the U.S. Department of the Treasury. It may be a good savings option for many tax filers, especially for those who don’t have access to retirement savings plans at work — like small business employees, part-time and temporary workers, and the self-employed. myRA is a Roth IRA1 that was designed to remove common barriers to saving and make it easy to get started. Saving with myRA is simple, safe, and affordable:

  • No cost to open, no minimums, and no fees
  • No complicated investment options
  • No risk of losing money
  • Backed by the U.S. Treasury
  • Savers choose the amount to contribute1
  • Money deposited is available when it’s needed2

Tax filers can make the most of their federal tax refunds with just three simple steps:

  1. Open a myRA account before filing a tax return by visiting myRA.gov or calling 855-406-6972.
  2. Provide the appropriate myRA account and routing numbers (111925074) to your tax preparer and indicate the amount of the federal tax refund that should be directed to the myRA account. If depositing a refund into multiple accounts, Form 8888 will need to be completed.
  3. Ask your preparer if you are also eligible for the Saver’s Tax Credit. Individuals may be eligible if they contribute to certain types of retirement savings accounts, like myRA.

Need help getting your taxes prepared? Contact the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program at Neighborhood Improvement Association to find a free tax preparation site near you: 912.447.5577 or www.niacdc.org


1Annual and lifetime contribution limits and annual earned income limits apply, as do conditions for tax-free withdrawal of interest. To learn about key features of a Roth IRA and for other requirements and details, visit myRA.gov/roth-ira.

2Interest earned may be withdrawn without tax and penalty five years after your first contribution if you are over age 59 ½, or if you meet certain other conditions, such as using the funds for the purchase of your first home.

Farewell to Step Up Board Members

December 16th, 2015 by

step up mugStep Up’s board meeting on December 15th marked the end of terms for eleven board members. We took a moment to honor their contributions to our organization by gifting a Step Up travel mug filled with chocolate (the Step Up staff’s favorite way to
show appreciation.)

Thank you to the following individuals for giving of their time and energy to support the mission of Step Up Savannah.

Earline Davis, Director of Housing Authority of Savannah

Bishop Willie Ferrell, Pastor of Royal Church of Christ

Dr. Alethea Frazier Raynor, Principal Associate of Annenberg Institute for School Reform at Brown University

Cathy Hill, Vice President of Georgia Power – Coastal Region

Mayor Edna Jackson

Dr. Otis Johnson, Former Mayor

Rev. James Nelson, Holy Spirit Lutheran Church

Diane Pinckney, Savannah Metro Police Department & NLA Graduate

Trip Tollison, President & CEO of Savannah Economic Development Authority

John Wills, President of Consumer Credit Counseling Service

Farewell Board Members

Step Up engages all sectors of the community to improve the economic mobility and financial stability of families in Savannah, Chatham County. Step Up is an independent 501(c)3 with a 39-member board of directors that counts 95 organizations as its partners. This network of business and government leaders, social service providers, neighborhood leaders and local volunteers form a nationally recognized partnership that seeks to engage the entire community in our mission.

Celebrating a Step Up Partner, Consumer Credit Counseling Service of the Savannah Area, Inc.

November 24th, 2015 by

CCCSSINCE 1965, local non-profit Consumer Credit Counseling Service of the Savannah Area, Inc. (CCCS) has delivered money management solutions to individuals and families. Their nationally certified counselors provide expert advice to help increase the financial knowledge of clients while helping them solve financial problems and achieve their goals.

CCCS consists of seven staff members committed to improving the financial health of members of the Savannah community. John Wills (right), executive director of CCCS, has served on Step Up’s Board of Directors and as the board chair in 2014. Richard Reeve (left) is the director of Financial Education for CCCS and works alongside Step Up in several different capacities.

How They Make a Difference

CCCS changes people’s lives by teaching them how to manage their debt, build their credit, prepare to buy a home, or avoid foreclosure through financial counseling and education. Find out more about CCCS  – www.cccssavannah.org

Workplace and Community Financial Education

Step Up Savannah and CCCS work together to provide a comprehensive menu of financial education for employees at worksites_RBC7498throughout Chatham County. They also offer workshops at public libraries and community-based workforce development
programs. Classes focus on applied learning, giving participants the opportunity to immediately use new knowledge and change behavior. For example, in a class about credit reports, participants pull their credit report, learn how to read and interpret it, and dispute any errors. In addition, workplace-based financial counseling means individuals can address critical financial concerns such as debt repayment, identity theft, foreclosure, or home purchase.

Using surveys and individual meetings with HR/program staff to identify the biggest needs and topics of interest to employees, Step Up and CCCS have offered popular classes such as “Improving Your Credit Score,” “Spending Plans,” and “Grow Your Savings.” They rely on an independently developed unbiased curricula called Smart Cents, the FDIC’s Money Smart program and Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) Foundation’s modules for classroom education.

Step Up and CCCS were recognized for their employer-based work by the Corporation for Enterprise Development (CFED) in its Platforms for Prosperity national contest in 2014.

Life Line Loan

_RBC7552In the spring of 2015, Georgia Heritage Federal Credit Union (GHFCU) partnered with Step Up and CCCS on the new Life Line
Loan, an employer-based loan program. Life Line is an affordable small-dollar loan ($300-$1500) available through employers that sign up with Georgia Heritage. The program is coupled with on-site financial education to ensure employees develop a better understanding of how to manage credit and debt. Loan payments are made through payroll deduction, and GHFCU reports loan payments to the credit bureaus to establish a positive credit history. Once the loan is paid in full, the loan payment amount continues to be withdrawn from payroll and deposited into the employee’s savings account until they opt out, allowing employees to build an emergency savings fund.

Five employers have signed up for the program– Chatham County, Chatham Area Transit, Goose Feathers Café, Hospice Savannah and Senior Citizens, Inc.– but it’s open to any employer.

Chatham Apprentice Program (CAP) Financial Education

Richard holds three 90 minute presentations that cover budgeting, creating financial goals, maximizing income, priortizing expenses, and understanding credit for each CAP class. In addition, he provides individual on-site credit review.

“Through partnerships and collaborative efforts,” Richard says about CCCS’ relationship with Step Up, “we can have a deeper and more meaningful impact in our community. Our relationship has allowed us to market and network our agency better, connected us with other national agencies and funders, and gotten us linked with policy work.”


Do you want to make a difference in your community? We can help you. Fill out our Commit to Action form here and together we will create opportunity in Savannah.

Images courtesy of Blake Crosby Photography.

From Corporate America to AmeriCorps VISTA

November 6th, 2015 by

By Janice Johannsen

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAFor 23 years, I was a slave to my job. I say this not to equate my status to African Americans who were enslaved in this country but because, at my worst moments, that is how I felt.

Before moving to Savannah, I worked for a major entertainment company in Hollywood, California, a Fortune 500 company that was owned by an even bigger multimedia corporation. I didn’t care much for my job but I went to work every day because the money was too good to pass up and the benefits were unbeatable. Those on the outside looking in thought it was exciting. I’d see George Clooney or Ashton Kutcher on my way to the commissary, work out next to George Lopez at the company gym and have access to free merchandise that beat the local Toys R’ Us.  At first, it was exciting; after all, a bright, shiny object is attractive but over time, like most everything else, it started losing its luster. When it was all said and done, I was nothing more than a cog in a wheel whose purpose was to protect the company’s assets so that it could continue to be a money-making machine.

Of course I’d be hypocritical if I didn’t acknowledge that I enjoyed the money. To live life comfortably is something most of us desire. But at what price?

Over 10 years ago, I got deeply involved with a small nonprofit organization that sends poor kids in the Philippines to school. It10941040_869838259726702_6142924340733328274_n was through this work that I realized I had the passion to do nonprofit work and that I could do it well. When we moved to Savannah because of my husband’s job, I knew I couldn’t go back to working in corporate America. After searching long and hard, I grabbed the opportunity to work for Step Up as an AmeriCorps VISTA.

I have to admit that initially I was afraid to take on the challenge. After all, it is easier to ignore poverty than to address it. I’ve always lead a fairly comfortable life and frankly, I was afraid that the work would be depressing. I am glad to say I was wrong.

11741022_954779277899266_1215838927150003950_o (1)My year as an AmeriCorps VISTA has been one of the best things I have done. I have met wonderful and inspiring people that I never would have met had I stayed in my own little world. I have spent time in poor neighborhoods and as a result I have a better understanding of people’s lives. Not having children of my own, I have learned that being with kids gives me so much joy. Perhaps most importantly, I have a renewed sense of hope that, when faced with adversity, a community can work together to make change. I found that when you are working to make a difference, the rewards are numerous and life-changing. I once read that the best kind of work is one that affects people. Whoever wrote that was right.

As I end my service as a VISTA, I leave with more experience, skills, and a clear idea about what I want to do next. Working for a cause such as reducing poverty shifts your focus in life. I may no longer get that generous paycheck but, for the past year, I have been coming home with a smile on my face instead.

Learn more about AmeriCorps VISTA 

Celebrating Neighborhood Leader, Autry McGary

October 29th, 2015 by

AutryBORN IN NEW ULM, Germany, Autry McGary attended public schools in various communities as her family moved around the country. Her passion for serving her community was cultivated early when they lived in New York City, and her family brought her along to feed homeless individuals. Ms. McGary has grown into an advocate with a focus on community engagement and remains deeply committed to advancing underserved people.

Since moving to Savannah, she has worked or volunteered for numerous agencies including the Rape Crisis Center of Savannah, Court Appointed Special Advocates of Savannah, Chatham County Department of Family and Children Services, the Salvation Army, Chatham County Health Department, and the United States Census Bureau. A graduate of Savannah State University with a Bachelor of Social Work, Autry earned an MSW from Clark Atlanta University, and is currently completing requirements for her PhD. She was recently recognized by the U.S. Army Garrison Command team with a Civilian Service Award for her work as a Program Director, advocating for military families in Savannah-Chatham and Effingham County school districts for Hunter Army Airfield.

Autry and the Neighborhood Leadership Academy

Autry was introduced to Step Up’s Neighborhood Leadership Academy (NLA) at Savannah State University, a 12 week leadership development program, by her colleague, NLA graduate and Step Up board member, Tabatha Crawford Roberts. Tabatha spoke highly of the program’s impact on her own life and urged Autry to apply. Autry was accepted in 2013 for Class 5 of NLA.

Autry said she was most impressed with the ideas about “the power of public voice and how leaders first begin making change in their own neighborhoods, one citizen at a time.” She learned how to start her own neighborhood association and how to identify community experts. But the program didn’t leave her to do it on her own. She says she completed NLA with a “network of support of community leaders who are invested in creating and continuing positive progress in Savannah and its residents.”

Numerous NLA graduates have been asked to serve on nonprofit and community boards and Autry is no exception. After graduating, she was invited to join the Board of Directors at a local Habitat for Humanity.

NLA not only sharpened Autry’s focus on making a difference in her neighborhood, it also helped her in her work. Autry says she is now able to better identify with her clients because she gained a deeper appreciation for the range and depth of issues that low-income families face. NLA also introduced her to numerous resources in Savannah that she has drawn upon as a social worker.

“I now look at my clients, community, family, and peers through a new lens since my toolkit for assisting them with the services they need was enhanced and strengthened by the practical and meaningful information I gained from NLA,” she said.

She continues as an active member of the newly formed NLA Alumni Association and regularly steps up when asked. Savannah is fortunate to recognize NLA graduates such as Autry McGary in its extended network of people seeking to make a difference.

About our Neighborhood Leadership Academy

Step Up created the Neighborhood Leadership Academy at Savannah State University (NLA) to support and develop neighborhood voices. Step Up staff and facilitators draw from various community leadership training approaches while continually learning from local residents, their expressed needs, ideas, and passions. The syllabus and approach has changed as facilitators learned from each new group of participants, evolving in response to critical evaluation and feedback. This organic approach to leadership training keeps Step Up’s approach fresh even as it draws heavily from a range of well-established tools and critical thinkers in the field.

Do you want to make a difference in your community? We can help you. Fill out our Commit to Action form here and together we will create opportunity in Savannah.

Images courtesy of Blake Crosby Photography.

Celebrating a Step Up Partner, St. Mary’s Community Center

October 23rd, 2015 by

St. Mary'LOCATED ON W. 36th Street in the Cuyler-Brownville neighborhood,
St. Mary’s sits in the heart of a census tract where 61% of its residents are living below the poverty level. This former neighborhood school has been transformed into a vital hub of community services under the leadership of Sister Pat Baber. A former elementary school principal, Sister Pat was invited 16 years ago by Paul Hinchey to become the director of a new outreach initiative of St. Joseph’s/Candler.

How They Make a Difference

  • Preschool for 3-4 year olds with emphasis on language development
  • Financial literacy
  • Professional counseling
  • Job training services – job searches, interview preparation, resume and application assistance
  • Computer lab and basic computer instruction
  • Assistance for elderly

Our Partnership

St. Mary’s has been a leading advocate of Step Up from the beginning. In 2003, Sister Pat (pictured to the right) and other community leaders received _RBC7275 an invitation to participate in a citywide anti-poverty task force. Sister Pat recalls how the task force’s discussion groups were unique because individuals from all sectors of the community rallied around the belief that “poverty was an economic issue for all.” This was the first time she witnessed a diverse group of community members that understood the negative impact of Savannah’s stagnant poverty rate. She thought there was definitely something to this idea and she was happy to be a part of it. It was this task force that would eventually become Step Up Savannah, Inc.

Since then Sister Pat believes that “Step Up has raised the consciousness of the community.” Through poverty simulations and collaborations, Step Up keeps poverty a part of all community discussions. She credits Step Up with helping the community to understand the barriers faced by low-income individuals in Savannah. The staff of St. Mary’s is grateful for the long-lasting relationships established by Step Up, which transcend socio-economic differences to find solutions that benefit all members of our community.

The partnership between St. Mary’s and Step Up is still strong today. Today, we partner with St. Mary’s in the following capacities:

Public Benefit Screening – St. Mary’s serves as one of the community’s SNAP and Healthy Kids enrollment sites. Kimberly (pictured below), a client of St. Mary’s, shared how St. Mary’s helped her navigate the system to acquire health insurance for her family. When her _RBC7327daughter was diagnosed with meningitis, St. Mary’s assisted her in securing health insurance. This prevented the family from accruing thousands of dollars of medical debt. Kimberly said that St. Mary’s is “very nice and easy to work with. They helped me get a lot of things done that I couldn’t do. They submitted our paperwork and for over a month followed up to make sure my daughter had the insurance she needed.” The SNAP and National League of Cities grants secured by Step Up help St. Mary’s to continue this very important work and help many more people just like Kimberly.

Workforce Development – In addition to the monthly caseload handled by Mary Fuller (pictured below), St. Mary’s Workforce Developer, St. Mary’s also partners with our Chatham Apprentice Program (CAP) to host a four-week workforce-training program on-site.

Volunteer Tax Assistance – In collaboration with Neighborhood Improvement Association and Step Up, St. Mary’s serves as a Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) site in January and February.

Step Up’s partnership with St. Mary’s has existed for ten years, but Sister Pat says that it is important that this work continues. It is a marathon, not a sprint. “I’ve been working 16 years,” said Sr. Pat, “and I don’t feel that I’ve scratched the surface. But I believe in people’s goodness, and where there is goodness, hope is going to grow.”

Together, Step Up Savannah and St. Mary’s Community Center want to be a part of that growing hope.

You can become a part of that growing hope as well. Let us help you. Fill out our Commit to Action form here and together we will create opportunity in Savannah.

Images courtesy of Blake Crosby Photography.

Celebrating CAP Graduate, Joyce Moore

October 21st, 2015 by

joyceJOYCE MOORE, known as “Mama Joyce” by her fellow CAP participants, has a nurturing spirit and warm smile that makes everyone she engages with feel accepted instantly.The spirit that encouraged her fellow CAP participants was developed nearly 40 years before as she raised five children in Savannah’s Yamacraw Village. Even as a young mother, Joyce was committed to education, earning an associate’s degree in Child Growth and Development, then pursuing a career working with children.

As her children grew and started families, she continued to work in childcare and further pursued her education. She had to stop, however, to care for her mother who was suffering from Alzheimer’s. After her mother’s death, Joyce moved into her son and daughter-in-law’s home in Savannah. She reached out to the unemployment office but was discouraged by the limited help they could provide.

Her long-time friend, Trudy Jones of United Way 2-1-1, told her about CAP. CAP not only helped Joyce find employment, but also helped her see herself in new way. She relays her story about a class exercise where students are asked to stand before a full-length mirror and prompted to try to see themselves as an outsider would. She said this was eye-opening as she had never stopped to consider who she was or how people viewed her. What she saw reflected in the mirror was the image of a beautiful and strong woman. She says she realized, “I may not be where I want to be, but I am not where I was. And that means a lot.”

As a CAP graduate, Joyce is following her passion again now working at Wesley’s Lady Bamford Early Learning Center. She hopes to move out of her son’s house by the end of the year and find a place of her own. She dreams of one day owning a home where her grandchildren (all 39 of them!) can visit and be encouraged and nurtured by Mama Joyce.

About our Chatham Apprentice Program

The Chatham Apprentice Program (CAP) is a workforce training program that teaches employability skills, individualized coaching, and employment placement for low income individuals facing multiple work barriers. CAP is a collaboration among Chatham County, Step Up Savannah, and community-based organizations; it is funded by Chatham County and United Way of the Coastal Empire. The most recent CAP classes are part of a newly designed program called “E3” for Educate, Empower, Employ. E3 works through partnering with community organizations and area employers, such as DIRTT, whose employees volunteer to conduct mock interviews with CAP participants.

Do you want to make a difference in your community? We can help you. Fill out our Commit to Action form here and together we will create opportunity in Savannah.

Images courtesy of Blake Crosby Photography.